GREEN BERETS Zumbrun, James Henry (Jimmy)

Devil's Brigade
By Robert H. Adleman, George Walton

John Robertson

Administrator
Staff member
  • SURNAME
Zumbrun
  • FORENAME
James Henry (Jimmy)
  • UNIT
5 SF Group (MACV-SOG-CCC)
  • RANK
Sergeant First Class
  • NUMBER
215407849
  • DATE OF DEATH
10th January 1970
  • AGE
26
  • GRAVESITE
United Church of Christ Cemetery,Manchester,Carroll County,Maryland D04-27e
  • ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
from Manchester,Maryland
born 9.7.1943
son of Champ Clark and Mary (nee Leister) Zumbrun
single
graduated North Carroll High School 1961
8 years service
medic
1 SF Group 1961-64
5 SF Group 1968-70
awards Silver Star with oak leaf cluster,Bronze Star with "V" device with 2 oak leaf clusters,Air Medal with oak leaf cluster,Army Commendation Medal with oak leaf cluster
KIA when observation aircraft 02-A (tail number 68-6863) (Covey) shot down in Laos
Vietnam Veterans Memorial,Washington,D.C. Panel 14W Line 24
 

DATE OF DEATH:

10-Jan-1970

AWARD:

https://www.specialforcesroh.com/index.php?threads/zumbrun-james-henry.31234/

CITATION:

Silver Star : The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, July 8, 1918 (amended by act of July 25, 1963), takes pleasure in presenting the Silver Star to Sergeant First Class James Henry Zumbrun, United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity in action while serving in the Republic of Vietnam. Sergeant First Class Zumbrun distinguished himself by exceptionally valorous actions March 13, 1968, as Special Forces adviser to a Vietnamese reconnaissance team. When moving through dense jungle, his patrol came in contact with an enemy platoon. He quickly placed fire on the enemy force. Outnumbered and drawing fire from three sides, he directed the withdrawal of the patrol, remaining behind to cover his comrades. Joining the other patrol members, he directed them to an extraction landing zone. With the enemy within 20 meters, he braved fire to protect the recovery helicopter and to direct gunships and airstrikes on enemy positions. As the last three patrol members were being hoisted into the recovery aircraft, the landing zone began receiving intense enemy fire. Sergeant First Class Zumbrun, realizing the aircraft and remaining patrol members were in grave danger, dropped 30 feet to the ground, enabling the aircraft to withdraw undamaged. A second recovery helicopter arrived and he was successfully extracted. Sergeant First Class Zumbrun's personal bravery and devotion to duty were in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit, and the United States Army.
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